Consortium invests US$29k in Tshongogwe Irrigation Scheme

Agriculture

Agriculture 384 Views comments

Consortium invests US$29k in Tshongogwe Irrigation Scheme

Consortium invests US$29k in Tshongogwe Irrigation Scheme

Agriculture

Agriculture 384 Views comments

Consortium invests US$29k in Tshongogwe Irrigation Scheme

Leonard Ncube in Victoria Falls

A CONSORTIUM of non-governmental organisations under the name, Sizimisele, has invested US$29 000 in Lupane District’s Tshongogwe Irrigation Scheme to help improve small holder farmers’ productive capacity.

Sizimisele is a consortium of 11 organisations funded through the Zimbabwe Resilience Building Fund (ZRBF), which is co-managed by the United Nations Development Fund (UNDP) and Zimbabwean Government.

The organisation is also implementing projects in Matopo and Insiza with USAid, the European Union and Sweden as key donors.

In Lupane, Sizimisele has rehabilitated Tshongogwe and Makhovula irrigations schemes as well as a dam in ward 21. District field co-ordinator, Mr Thandazani Mkhwananzi, said Sizimisele prioritises four pillars namely community managed disaster risk reduction, productivity, entrepreneurship and livelihood diversification, and systems change.

“We’re focusing mainly on resilience building making sure that communities are ready for hazards such as droughts and diseases and ensuring they are able to bounce back and continue with their lives,” said Mr Mkhwananzi.

He said more resilience projects were ongoing in 22 of the district’s 28 wards.

“The organisation looks at disaster risk reduction plans highlighted by the community. At Tshongogwe Irrigation the focus was on rehabilitating the dam, which had dried up.

“We drilled boreholes and installed a drip system. The two boreholes were sunk at a cost of US$10 000 and we also installed a solar system and a pumping unit for US$13 000 while drip installation cost US$6 000,” said Mr Mkhwananzi.

He said solar boreholes will facilitate irrigation of two hectares at the scheme, which had scaled down production over the years owing to silting of the supply dam.

“We envisage a situation where with the funds from that we are able to then procure inputs for more crops when rains come and there is water in the dam. Now farmers will be able to continue cropping regardless of dryness of the dam hence we believe the community will be more resilient as we restore livelihoods,” Mr Mkhwananzi added.

He said upon getting to a district, the organisation identifies livelihood activities based on the competitive advantage of each ward.

Lupane is affected by drought and water shortages hence the focus on water sour

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